Usernames, passwords, and access codes driving you crazy?  Don’t have a smartphone yet but need a solution TODAY, before the end of this SHIFT?

Yep, it’s true, you can just write them all down somewhere (the notebook in your pocket, the back of your badge, a slip of paper in your wallet) and, frankly, that’s what a lot of folks do, no matter how many times IT says it’s a terrible idea.  If you need the info to care for your patients and you just can’t keep it all straight in your head, what else are you supposed to do?

One option is to use the cell phone in your pocket.  Yes, that regular feature phone you’re already carrying around.  Here’s how.     Read more…

AndroidI’ve talked to several people who own an Android phone but have never downloaded any apps for it. I think that’s a shame.

Whether you are a student getting ready to take the NCLEX or an experienced nurse in an advanced specialty, you should put your phone to work for you as more than just a communications tool.

Read more…

Anyone who owns an iOS phone knows it; they have an iPhone, an iPad, or an iPod Touch.  Apple is great at branding and great at capturing mindshare for their handheld devices.

Anyone who owns a Blackberry knows it; they have a Blackberry Torch, Curve, Bold, etc.  Research In Motion has also done a great job of branding for their handsets and the Blackberry secure communications infrastructure that stands behind them.

But it’s different if you have an Android phone. Read more…

The jury is still out on whether personal smartphones (iPhones, Android phones, and Blackberries) are going to be welcomed as on-duty tools for nurses working in hospital settings.

Many hospitals have banned nurses and support staff from carrying or using any type of cellphone in patient areas.  I’ve heard from hospitals where inappropriate use by a few, such texting or Facebooking in front of patients, has resulted in phone bans for all.  I’ve also been told that bans have been instituted at other institutions due to concerns about smartphone cameras being used to violate patients’ privacy. Read more…

www.flickr.com/photos/spence_sir/2292757408/in/photostream/If you own a smartphone, you should have a flashlight app for it.  And know where to find it on your phone and how to use it.  Period.

Even if you don’t usually bother with downloading apps for your phone, make an exception in this case.  You may work in a hospital with big backup generators and lots of emergency lighting but when the main power goes out, you’ll want a handheld light of your own.  Even when the power is on, you will occasionally need to read a label on the back of a device or plug a cord into a small socket in a dark corner.  You may be organized enough to keep a flashlight in your car glove compartment AND keep the batteries fresh.  (I never have been, or even known anyone who was, but I admit the possibility that such people exist.)  That still won’t help you on a dark rainy night, standing outside your car, when you can’t see the lock well enough to get your key into it. Read more…